Eng 101 Summary Response Paper

3 cr. Presents techniques of investigating, interpreting, and appraising accounting records and assertions. Studies internal control design and evaluation, evidence-gathering techniques, and other topics. Develops an understanding and appreciation of the philosophy of the audit process and its practice. Focuses on issues relevant to an external auditing professional, such as audit risk analysis, planning of audit engagements, internal controls, and substantive testing. Presents the preparation of audit working papers supporting an examination of the financial records and internal control procedures of an enterprise. Covers the report and opinion of the auditor to management, stockholders, and considers the ethical and legal responsibilities of the auditor. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ACC 212 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. 5 cr. This is the second semester of the two-semester course for beginners, or a refresher course for non-native speakers with other equivalent experience. In this course, students will continue their introduction to basic standard Mandarin Chinese, spoken by over a billion people in mainland China, Taiwan, Singapore, and other parts of the world. They will learn to comprehend, speak, read, and write on a variety of topics related to daily life. The course will also expand on the student's growing knowledge of essential aspects of Chinese culture. Prerequisite: CHI 101 or demonstrated proficiency or equivalence. Lecture 5 hours per week. DNL 140 5 cr. Introduces students to human anatomy, physiology and occlusion. Emphasizes regions of the head and neck and the primary and permanent teeth. Provides a general overview of the masticatory system and the dynamics of mandibular movement. Includes laboratory exercises related to accurate scale drawings of the permanent teeth and tooth waxings of the permanent teeth. Features occlusal restorations fabricated in wax on a semi-adjustable articulator according to functional criteria. Covers fabrication procedure and demonstrations. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must pass all placement tests and have an interview with the program head to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes relating to dental laboratory technology. Lecture 3 hours. 1 cr. Provides the opportunity for in-depth study and research of an aspect of dental laboratory technology that is of particular interest to the student. A student may fabricate a type of dental appliance, demonstrate a particular technique using a table clinic with visual displays or Power Point presentation. Students must select a topic of interest that must be approved by their Instructor. The project's content must be more comprehensive in scope and depth than all other DNL courses offered in the Dental Lab Technology AAS degree curriculum. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must interview with the program head to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental lab technology. Lecture 1 hour per week. 3 cr. Introduces learners to the fundamentals of creating and organizing online courses according to the ASSURE Model of instructional design and the standards created by Quality Matters. IDOL covers analyzing learners; writing proper learning objectives; ADA compliance; selecting methods, media, and materials to be used within an online course; utilizing those methods, media, and materials; requiring learner participation; evaluating and revising your course; assessing and measuring performance; and a self-reflection. Prerequisites: Basic computer skills, ability to navigate the World Wide Web, experience using Blackboard in teaching for at least one semester, and permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. 3 cr. Introduces students to critical thinking and the fundamentals of academic writing. Through the writing process, students refine topics; develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate resources; edit for effective style and usage; and determine appropriate approaches for a variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes. Writing activities will include exposition and argumentation with at least one researched essay. ENG 111 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: Placement recommendation for ENG 111 or placement recommendation for co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. ENG 111 is a prerequisite for ENG 112. Lecture 3 hours per week. HCT 101 3 cr. Teaches basic care skills with emphasis on physical, social, and emotional needs of patients. Covers procedures, communications, and interpersonal relations; observation, charting, and reporting; care planning, safety, and infection control; anatomy and physiology, nutrition and patient feeding; and ethics, death, and dying. Prepares multi-skilled health care workers to care for patients of various ages with special emphasis on geriatric nursing, home health, and long- and short-term care facilities. Prerequisites: Competency in MTE 1 or higher as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by completing MTE 1; competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of ENF 2; ability to meet physical expectations of patient care; mandatory criminal background check and drug test; current (through the end of class) proof of negative TB; physical ability to lift and move clients, hear audible alarms and sounds, auscultate certain physical parameters, such as blood pressure and breathing; and ability to interact effectively with clients/families and health care team members. Co-requisite: HCT 102. 4 cr. Applies theory through laboratory experience for health care technicians to work in home health, and long- and short-term facilities. Prerequisites: Competency in MTE 1 or higher as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by completing MTE 1; competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of ENF 2; ability to meet physical expectations of patient care; mandatory criminal background check and drug test; current (through the end of class) proof of negative TB; physical ability to lift and move clients, hear audible alarms and sounds, auscultate certain physical parameters, such as blood pressure and heart and lung sounds; and ability to interact effectively with clients/families and health care team members. Co-requisite: HCT 101. 3 cr. Provides an overview of the male anatomy and examines health status from birth to death from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include major, chronic, and infectious diseases; mental health, andropause, stress, sleep, aging, exercise, nutrition, sexual health, and grooming; and the impact of a male role model on health. HLT 204 3 cr. Explores current issues related to women's health and wellness with an emphasis upon prevention of disease and optimum well-being. Takes a multi-ethnic approach to exploring the most up-to-date findings, diagnostic tools, and treatments for breast cancer, reproductive tract illness, heart disease, and other common diseases faced by women from puberty through menopause. Lecture 3 hours per week. 3 cr. Introduces the fundamental principles of food preparation and basic culinary procedures. Stresses the use of proper culinary procedures combined with food science, proper sanitation, standards of quality for food items that are made, and proper use and care of kitchen equipment. Prerequisites: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a college-level composition course. Students needing to complete developmental studies courses in English or mathematics may take those courses concurrently with HRI courses, if approved by the program head. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: HRI 158 or HRI 115. Lecture 2 hours. 3 cr. Instructs the student in the preparation of breads, pastries, baked desserts, candies, frozen confections, and sugar work. Applies scientific principles and techniques of baking. Promotes the knowledge/skills required to prepare baked items, pastries, and confections. Prerequisites: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a college-level composition course. Students needing to complete developmental studies courses in English or mathematics may take those courses concurrently with HRI courses, if approved by the program head. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: HRI 158 or HRI 115. Lecture 2 hours. 2 cr. Assigns problems for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Provides the student and instructor an opportunity to work together to identify the critical areas of need in the student's repertoire. An individualized plan will be developed to address the student's weaknesses and to lead progressively to a group demonstration of critical skills. Individual assessment constitutes the majority of this course. Lab, lecture, research, and out-of-class projects will be utilized. Prerequisites: HRI 106, HRI 219, HRI 218, HRI 220, HRI 206, HRI 207, HRI 145, HRI 128, HRI 159, HRI 119, HRI 122, HRI 134, HRI 251, and HRI 224. Lecture 1 hour. 4 cr. Introduces the student to Relational Database and Relational Database theory. Includes planning, defining, and using a database; table design, linking, and normalization; and types of databases, database description, and definition. Additional topics cover the use of Entity Relationship (ER) modeling in detail through many real-life examples and practical business problems and solutions. After several iterations, the ER model captures the data requirements and business rules and forms a sound basis for the initial design of a relational database. The introduction to SQL allows for the implementation of a database design using SQL. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. 4 cr. Prepares the student for a role on an organizational IT support staff where the need for resolving computer incidents is becoming increasingly common. Includes legal and ethical issues of search and seizure of computer and peripheral storage media leading to laboratory exercises examining computers configured with mix of both simulated criminal and other activities which are not criminal in nature, but do violate scenario-driven organizational policy. Requires the student to make choices/recommendations for further pursuit of forensics evidence gathering and analysis. Students will select and gather the utilities and procedures necessary for a court-acceptable forensics toolkit which will then be used to gather and examine specially configured desktop computers. Students will then participate in a mock court proceeding using the collected evidence. Credit will be given to either ITN 275 or ITN 276 and ITN 277, but not all three courses. Prerequisite: ITN 260 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours. 4 cr. Introduces concepts of nursing practice and conceptual learning. Focuses on basic nursing concepts with an emphasis on safe nursing practice and the development of the nursing process. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories, clinical/community settings, and/or simulated environments. Prerequisites: BIO 141 or BIO 231 or NAS 161; ENG 111, PSY 230, SDV 100, CPR � American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers, acceptance to the Nursing AAS program, and evidence of completion of Nursing AAS program required documents. Co-requisites: BIO 142 or BIO 232 or NAS 162; NSG 106, NSG 130, and NSG 200. Lecture 3 hours. NSG 106 2 cr. Focuses on the application of concepts through clinical skill development. Emphasizes the use of clinical judgment in skill acquisition. Includes principles of safety, evidence-based practice, informatics and math computational skills. Prepares students to demonstrate competency in specific skills and drug dosage calculation including the integration of skills in the care of clients in simulated settings. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories, clinical/community settings, and/or simulated environments. Prerequisites: BIO 141 or BIO 231 or NAS 161; ENG 111, PSY 230, SDV 100, MTE 1-5, CPR -- American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers, acceptance to the Nursing AAS program, and evidence of completion of Nursing AAS program required documents. Co-requisites: BIO 142 or BIO 232 or NAS 162; NSG 100, NSG 130, and NSG 200. Lecture 1 hour. NSG 200 3 cr. Introduces assessment and health promotion for the individual and family. Includes assessment of infants, children, adults, geriatric clients and pregnant females. Emphasizes health history and the acquisition of physical assessment skills with underlying concepts of development, communication, and health promotion. Prepares students to demonstrate competency in the assessment of clients across the lifespan. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories, clinical/community settings, and/or simulated environments. Prerequisites: BIO 141 or BIO 231 or NAS 161; ENG 111, PSY 230, SDV 100, MTE 1-5, CPR � American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers, acceptance to the AAS Nursing AAS program, and evidence of completion of Nursing AAS program required documents. Co-requisites: BIO 142 or BIO 232 or NAS 162; NSG 100, NSG 106, and NSG 130. Lecture 2 hours. NSG 230 2 cr. Develops the role of the professional nurse in the healthcare environment in preparation for practice as a registered nurse. Introduces leadership and management concepts and focuses on the integration of professional behaviors in a variety of healthcare settings. Prerequisites: ENG 112, NSG 210, and NSG 211 with grades of C or above. Co-requisites: CST 229 or PHI 101 or PHI 220 or PHI 225 or PHI 227; NSG 252, and NSG 270. Lecture 2 hours. NSG 252 4 cr. Focuses on nursing care of diverse individuals and families integrating complex health concepts. Emphasizes clinical judgment, patient-centered care and collaboration. Prerequisites: ENG 112, NSG 210, and NSG 211 with grades of C or above. Co-requisites: CST 229 or PHI 101 or PHI 220 or PHI 225 or PHI 227; NSG 230, and NSG 270. Lecture 4 hours per week. 4 cr. Provides students with the opportunity to comprehensively apply and integrate learned concepts from previous nursing courses into a capstone experience. Emphasizes the mastery of patient-centered care, safety, nursing judgment, professional behaviors, informatics, quality improvement, and collaboration in the achievement of optimal outcomes of care. Provides supervised learning experiences in faculty and/or preceptor-guided college nursing laboratories, clinical/community settings, and/or simulated environments. Prerequisites: ENG 112, NSG 210, and NSG 211 with grades of C or above. Co-requisites: CST 229 or PHI 101 or PHI 220 or PHI 225 or PHI 227; NSG 230, and NSG 252. Laboratory 12 hours per week 3 cr. Teaches fundamental principles of patient care with laboratory experience in foods and fluids; elimination; moving patients; morning, afternoon, and evening care; care of hospital equipment; means of providing special comforts and safety; admission and discharge procedures; infection control; home management; and simple first aid. Prerequisites and Co-requisites: 18 years of age or older; competency in MTE 1 or higher as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by completing MTE 1; competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of ENF 2; physically able to lift and move clients, hear audible alarms and sounds, auscultate certain physical parameters, such as blood pressure, and heart and lung sounds; and interact effectively with clients/families and health care team members. Lecture 2 hours. NUR 26 3 cr. Focuses on theory and provides laboratory experiences in asepsis, sterile techniques, tube feedings, and other skills required by nursing assistants in health care agencies. Prerequisites: CNA certification for at least three (3) years; recommendation from a licensed nursing professional (LPN or RN); evidence of no restrictions on CNA certification by the Virginia Board of Nursing for the last five (5) years; recommendation for advanced certification from an LPN or RN who has supervised the applicant in providing direct patient care for at least six (6) months within the past year; American Heart Associate CPR BLS for the Health Care Professional certification; ability to pass a background check and drug screen; and ability to meet functional health and immunization requirements. Co-requisite: NUR 31. NUR 31 3 cr. Teaches advanced level skills for Certified Nurse Aides, including basic IV therapy, EKG, and catheterization. Prerequisites: CNA certification for at least three (3) years; recommendation from a licensed nursing professional (LPN or RN); evidence of no restrictions on CNA Certification by the Virginia Board of Nursing for the last five (5) years; recommendation for advanced certification from a licensed nurse who has supervised the applicant in providing direct patient care for at least six (6) months within the past year; American Heart Associate CPR BLS for the Health Care Professional certification; ability to pass a background check and drug screen; and ability to meet functional health and immunization requirements. Co-requisites: NUR 26; a student must successfully complete both NUR 26 and NUR 31 to be eligible for Advanced Nurse Aide certification. Lecture 1 hour. NUR 108 5 cr. Introduces principles of nursing, health and wellness concepts, and the nursing process. Identifies nursing strategies to meet the multidimensional needs of individuals. Includes math computational skills, basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care, introduction to the profession of nursing, nursing process, and documentation; and basic needs related to integumentary system, teaching/learning, stress, psychosocial, safety, nourishment, elimination, oxygenation, circulation, rest, comfort, sensory, fluid and electrolyte, and mobility needs in adult clients. Also includes care of the peri-operative (pre-, intra-, and post-operative) client. Provides supervised learning experience in college nursing laboratories and/or cooperating agencies. Prerequisites: NUR 111/115, BIO 141, BIO 142, SDV 100, ENG 111, MTH 126. Prerequisites or co-requisites: PSY 230. Co-requisites: NUR 226, NUR 245. Lecture 3 hours. NUR 109 6 cr. Focuses on nursing care of individuals and/or families experiencing alterations in health. Includes math computational skills and basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care and immunological, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, oncological, and diabetic disorders, and pre- and post-operative care in adult and pediatric clients. The student is introduced to the nursing management of the chronically ill adult client with health care needs in the areas of oxygenation, perfusion, metabolism, mobility, immunity, and end-of-life care. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or cooperating agencies. Prerequisites: NUR 111/115, NUR 108, NUR 245, NUR 226, ENG 111, MTH 126, BIO 141, BIO 142, SDV 100, PSY 230. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: ITE 115, SOC 200. Co-requisite: NUR 247. NUR 115 3 cr. Introduces the role of the registered nurse through concepts and skill development in the discipline of professional nursing. Serves as a bridge for licensed practical nurses and is based upon individualized articulation agreements, mobility exams, or other assessment criteria as they relate to local programs and service areas. Includes math computational skills and basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care. This course contrasts the role of the registered nurse to the practicing LPN and focuses on concepts of safety, legal and ethical nursing practice, and the theoretical foundations for nursing care. Role development is facilitated through classroom learning activities and self-learning activities. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the LPN to AAS in Nursing program, current and unrestricted license as an LPN in Virginia, completion of background and drug screening, current CPR with American Heart Association BLS for Healthcare Provider, and grade of C or above in the following courses: SDV 100, BIO 141, ENG 111, MTH 126. Co-requisites: BIO 142 and NUR 226. Lecture 3 hours per week. 6 cr. Focuses on the use of nursing process to provide care to individuals and families with acute medical or surgical problems or to prevent such problems. Includes math computational skills and basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care. Provides supervised learning experiences in cooperating agencies. Prerequisites: NUR 111/115, SDV 100, BIO 141, BIO 142, ENG 111, MTH 126, PSY 230, NUR 108, NUR 226, NUR 245, SOC 200, ITE 115, NUR 247, and NUR 109. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: humanities/fine arts elective. Co-requisites: NUR 246; NUR 254 or 298. (NUR 298 must be taken concurrently with last clinical nursing course.) Lecture 3 hours. 1 cr. Requires completion of a project or research report related to the student's occupational objectives and a study of approaches to the selection and pursuit of career opportunities in the field. In addition, this course presents intensive correlation of major professional nursing subject areas reflecting the entry-level practitioner environment and the transition from student to professional nurse practitioner. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SDV 100, BIO 141, BIO 142, ENG 111, MTH 126, PSY 230, SOC 200, ITE 115, NUR 111/115, NUR 108, NUR 226, NUR 245, NUR 109, NUR 247, NUR 254, and either NUR 246 or NUR 208 with grade of C or above in each course. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Approved humanities/fine arts elective. Co-requisite: Either NUR 246 or NUR 208. This course must be taken concurrently with the last course in the curriculum. Lecture 1 hour per week. PHT 264 3 cr. Teaches theory and practice of digital photography, including the Adobe Photoshop techniques needed for top quality inkjet prints. Emphasizes use of digital cameras in studio and on location. Teaches advanced techniques of image editing, including photo restoration and multi-image compositing. Students work with existing images, including family snapshots and antique photographs, as well as photographs shot specifically for the course. In addition to prescribed assignments a personal project allows for exploration of creative ideas and topics of the student's choice. Provides training in digital image transmission from remote locations. Prerequisites: Students taking this course should feel comfortable working at a computer, be familiar with negotiating program menus, and know how files are saved and stored. A camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter is required. Lecture 2 hours. 3 cr. Introduces students to the religions of the world with attention to origin, history, and doctrine. Focuses on the development of systems of faith in various human cultures, with a concentration on Eastern religions. Introduces the academic study of religion, issues of faith, and specific world religions. Examines the historical evolution, the fundamental doctrines and beliefs, and the practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of these religious traditions. Also deals with some of the essential differences and similarities that exist among each religious tradition, and points to the uniqueness of each of them. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. 3 cr. Introduces students to the religions of the world with attention to origin, history, and doctrine. Focuses on the development of systems of faith in various human cultures, with a concentration on the rise of the monotheistic faiths and the distinction between primal or "oral" religions and "historical" religions. Introduces the academic study of religion, issues of faith, and specific world religions. Examines the historical evolution, the fundamental doctrines and beliefs, and the practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of these religious traditions. Also deals with some of the essential differences and similarities that exist among each religious tradition and points to the uniqueness of each of them. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. 3 cr. Surveys various manifestations of religion in the American experience. Emphasizes concepts, problems, and issues of religious pluralism and character of American religious life. Examines the role of religion in America with particular emphasis on religion in contemporary America. Includes the history, beliefs, and practices of the world's major religions in America, as well as an examination of new religious developments. Examines the relationship between American religion and American identity, the rise of civil and cultural religion, and the role of religion in public policy and American culture. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. 2 cr. Assists students in transition to college. Provides overviews of college policies, procedures, and curricular offerings. Encourages contacts with other students and staff. Assists students toward college success through information regarding effective study habits, career and academic planning, and college resources available to students. Surveys career options available to students. Stresses career development and assists in the understanding of self in the world of work. Assists students in applying decision-making to career choices. Strongly recommended for beginning students who have not selected a major. This course will fulfill the SDV 100 requirement, which is a graduation requirement for degrees and full certificate programs. Lecture 2 hours per week. 2 cr. Introduces students to the skills which are necessary to achieve their academic goals, to services offered at the college, and to the mastery skills needed for precalculus (MTH 163). Covers topics such as services at the college, including the library; counseling and advising; listening, test taking, and study skills; and topical areas applicable to precalculus. Topics in mathematics may include, but are not limited to, factoring polynomials, arithmetic operations on polynomials, synthetic and long division of polynomials, using the rules of exponents to simplify algebraic expressions, and graphing calculator usage. Emphasizes study skills and strategies specific to students in math courses. Meets SDV requirements for graduation. Prerequisites: A placement recommendation for MTH 163 and completion of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry or equivalent. Co-requisite: Enrollment in college-designated section of MTH 163. Lecture 2 hours per week.

ENG 101 Summary Response Paper ENG 101 Summary Response Paper
ENG 101 Summary Response Paper ENG 101 Summary Response Paper

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